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"böhmisch" und "tschechisch" - Denglish

About "böhmisch" und "tschechisch"

Previous Entry "böhmisch" und "tschechisch" Mar. 6th, 2005 @ 02:49 pm Next Entry
Looking at old German-Czech dictionaries one starts wondering, when was the word "böhmisch" abandoned in favor of "tschechisch", and what was the reason for this change in German?

Upd. I live in Czech Republic myself, I know there is Bohemia and Moravia, and I know what's the German name of Bohemia. My question is not about that. My question is why Czech language was called "böhmisch" and when and why it was finally renamed to "tschechisch".
Feeling: curiouscurious
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From:samostatnost
Date:March 6th, 2005 02:34 pm (UTC)
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I think that the word "böhmisch" refers specifically to the province of Bohemia, but "tschechisch" refers to what are called the "Czech lands" - which include the province of Bohemia and the province of Moravia. I don't know that for sure, but I speak both Czech and German and that's how I understand it. I hope that helps, and I hope I'm not completely wrong!
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From:rydel23
Date:March 6th, 2005 07:15 pm (UTC)
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Maybe I didn't formulate my question clearly enough, please see an Upd note.
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From:samostatnost
Date:March 6th, 2005 11:18 pm (UTC)
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I don't know.
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From:slash_kitten
Date:March 6th, 2005 04:14 pm (UTC)
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'Böhmen' is a region in what's now Czech Republic and/or Poland. I've been there as a child, but I don't remember very well. However, it's rather small (the tales around Rübezahl play in Böhmen), and pretty hidden (lots of woods and stones). I suppose it was changed to adapt to Czech, because Czech Republic is more than just Böhmen.
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From:argentina
Date:March 6th, 2005 06:17 pm (UTC)
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Bohemia isn't in Poland, it's part of the Czech Republic, and considering how Prague is in Bohemia, it can't really be called small and/or hidden ;)

Maybe you mean "Böhmerwald"? For that I guess your description would fit. But that's just a part of Bohemia, in its South to be exact, and it does have lots of woods and stones and hills.

To the original poster- the Czech Republic consists of Bohemia/Böhmen/Cechy, Moravia/Mähren/Morava and parts of Silesia (?)/Schlesien/Slezsko, the rest of which is in Poland. So I'd assume the term Böhmen was abandoned as it didn't include the whole country. When, I don't know.
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From:rydel23
Date:March 6th, 2005 07:15 pm (UTC)
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Maybe I didn't formulate my question clearly enough, please see an Upd note.
From:ryf
Date:March 6th, 2005 09:37 pm (UTC)
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As argentina said: So I'd assume the term Böhmen was abandoned as it didn't include the whole country. When, I don't know. We don't say 'Bay(e)risch' instead of 'Deutsch' because Bayern is not Germany. And Böhmen is not Tschechien. The borders changed, the name of the country changed and so appearantely the name for the language was changed to be 'politically correct' as we now call it.
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From:slash_kitten
Date:March 6th, 2005 07:21 pm (UTC)
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ok, sorry.
From:apokalypse
Date:March 6th, 2005 07:22 pm (UTC)
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My guess is that it has to do with politics, i.e., postwar nation-building and how this relates to shifting ideas of "politically correct" names for languages.
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From:rydel23
Date:March 7th, 2005 05:21 pm (UTC)
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> but (if I may)

Thanks. That's right, I made a mistake.

> You'll be doing it like a pro in no time.

I don't think so. I've been writing in English (school essays, letters, emails, etc.) since 1993, but I noticed that at some point I just stopped progressing. In fact, I think my English even deteriorated. I guess, once I achieved a certain level of fluency I just lost motivation to improve it further. :(
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